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Fuels

Five. The SIMW regulation requires that a component manufacturer must test a minimum of five components according to §2856(a)(3)(D). All five components tested must pass the applicable standard(s) in order to obtain certification.

Recreational Vehicles & Watercraft

Five. The SIMW regulation requires that a component manufacturer must test a minimum of five components according to §2856(a)(3)(D). All five components tested must pass the applicable standard(s) in order to obtain certification.

No, the SIMW regulation requires that all testing must be performed by an independent laboratory according to §2856(a)(3)(D). Independent laboratory is defined per §2853(a)(18). Note that the durability portion of test procedures can be performed in-house, but the test data must be generated by an independent laboratory.

Cars & Trucks

Vehicle manufacturers are required to contact car owners whenever there is a recall repair required for their vehicle. If the manufacturer is unable to contact the owner directly, the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) will notify the owner to contact any their dealerships for a free recall repair.

Once the repair is performed, the dealership will issue a "Proof of Correction" document to the vehicle owner to return to the DMV so that the registration can be renewed.

All questions regarding the recall repair, such as what it entails and how long it will take, should be addressed by the dealership service staff. Please contact your local dealer for an appointment and any questions you have regarding the service.

If there are problems where the dealership cannot perform the required service, please contact the CARB at (800) 242-4450.

Vehicles first sold, or vehicles intended for sale by their manufacturers outside the United States are called NON-USA or "Grey Market" cars. Greymarket cars are typically not able to be used or registered in California. The following information lists the minimum requirements to register a greymarket car in California:

If the Model Year of the vehicle is:

1967 and older: no modifications and testing are required to register the vehicle in California.

1968 to 1974: California does not recommend the purchase or importation of these years of NON-USA vehicles, even if currently registered in another state. These vehicles require compliance with USEPA requirements in effect on the specific date of 11/15/1972. This provision when written, was considered by the California legislature as a gradual phase-out of very dirty "non-collectable" types of imports, as this specific requirement was understood to become increasingly difficult to meet. Today, this requirement, while not impossible to meet, would require testing expenses and modifications that far exceed most vehicles value and would make little sense from a collectors standpoint to attempt. Some limited exemptions apply to individuals moving to California with vehicles of these years registered in their home state for at least a year before moving to California. Contact us for more information.

1975 and newer BUT greater than 2 years from the date of production: These vehicles require a "Certificate of Conformance" issued by the ARB after a successful laboratory test. This test is administered to the same standards required of new vehicle manufacturers, and for the model year of the vehicle . However, unlike new vehicle manufacturers, as an individual you are not required to meet the full range of additional testing and equipment standards such as On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) requirements, durability testing, low emission fleet averaging, or Zero Emissions Vehicle testing (LEV and ZEV requirements). So while these standards reference what a manufacturer must do, when required by the Direct Import requirements they apply to individuals importing a used motor vehicle. Some limited exemptions apply to individuals moving to California with vehicles of these years registered in their home state for at least a year before moving to California.

Important note regarding NEW greymarket vehicles: any greymarket vehicle obtained by a California resident within two years of its date of production or any greymarket vehicle entering California within two years of its date of production are considered NEW vehicles and are forever prohibited from registration in California. No modifications on NEW vehicles are permitted.

General information regarding non-USA market vehicles: Grey Market vehicle regulations, like the new vehicle certification standards they are based on, are a performance standard and do not have specific equipment requirements. Whatever equipment the vehicle owner or vehicle modifier choose to make the vehicle pass the laboratory test, these will be the equipment requirements for all future inspections. In addition this means all vehicle and engine technologies are subject to the same standard. All fuels, all engine sizes, displacements, no. of cylinders, engine types and designs, even electric and hybrid vehicles must prove compliance by laboratory testing. Unlike California's basic Smog Check program, the Direct Import program does not have exemptions other than the original 1967 model year and older exclusion outlined above. And as a final note, these regulations only apply to passenger cars and light-duty trucks. Motorcycles and heavy-duty engines (used in trucks and buses) are required to comply with CA or USEPA from the date of manufacturer, no after-the-fact modification is permitted for products first sold outside the US market.

REFERENCE| California Code of Regulation Title 13: https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/onroad/cert/ldctp/udi.pdf

Exemptions

Diesel vehicles:

1979 model year and older vehicles with original-equipment diesel engines are exempt from Direct Import lab testing requirements. Please note that any vehicle converted to operate on diesel fuel is subject to lab testing requirements if it is a 1968 model year vehicle or newer.

How to tell if a vehicle was made for the USA or California Market

All vehicles sold in the United States have a unique drive-train identifier called the "Test Group" or "Engine Family Number". This number allows owners, parts suppliers, and service providers to determine specifications and installed emissions control equipment of motor vehicles. Because many vehicles may have several different configurations, this number will provide specific information about the emissions control system and exact standards that a vehicle was designed to meet.

The Vehicle Emission Control Information label is located in the engine compartment in a clearly visible position, most often directly on the underside of the hood. The following diagram can help you locate your vehicles label.

Diagram of location of vehicle emissions label

 

All vehicles sold in the United States have a unique drive-train identifier called the "Test Group" or "Engine Family Number". This number allows owners, parts suppliers, and service providers to determine specifications and installed emissions control equipment of motor vehicles. Because many vehicles may have several different configurations, this number will provide specific information about the emissions control system and exact standards that a vehicle was designed to meet.

The Vehicle Emission Control Information label is located in the engine compartment in a clearly visible position, most often directly on the underside of the hood. The following diagram can help you locate your vehicles label.

Diagram of location of vehicle emissions label

 

LINK: https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/consumer_info/testgroup_efn.htm

VW Diesel Vehicles

What did Volkswagen do?

Between 2009 and 2015, Volkswagen (VW) sold approximately 500,000 2.0 L diesel vehicles equipped with "defeat devices" designed to control emissions during certification and to illegally turn off emissions controls during on-road driving. These vehicles emit up to 40 times more nitrogen oxide (NOx) than EPA and California-compliant levels. NOx is an air pollutant that contributes to the formation of ozone and particulate matter. It can greatly aggravate health problems such as asthma and cardio-pulmonary disease, and is a particularly serious and expensive problem in California.

What is this Partial Consent Decree?

This partial consent decree partially resolves these alleged violations. For more details on the overall national agreement, see http://www.VWcourtsettlement.com.

It is referred to as “partial” because it does not deal with actual penalties against the company. Those will be determined through a separate process.

What does the Partial Consent Decree do?

When final, the partial consent decree (consent decree) provides every vehicle owner a choice on how to handle their vehicle, and fully mitigates all environmental harm associated with VW's use of a defeat device. This consent decree sends a clear message that California's tough vehicle emissions certification program catches cheaters, and that evading California's air quality rules is not only illegal and wrong, but also an expensive and ill-advised business decision. CARB has a stringent vehicle emission certification, compliance, and enforcement program that will only get tougher on cheaters and others who do not strictly adhere to the requirements.

How much money will California receive under this Consent Decree?

California will receive about $1.2 billion in total. VW must pay into two separate programs. The first provides about $381 million to California for NOx mitigation (the Mitigation Trust). The second will be a zero emission vehicle (ZEV) investment fund (the ZEV Investment Commitment). $800 million dollars from that fund will be invested in California. This money does not address penalties or any claims concerning 3.0-liter diesel vehicles, and does not address any potential criminal liability. Those will be addressed in a separate process.

When will money for mitigation be available for projects?

Within 60 days of the establishment of the Mitigation Trust, Governor Brown will certify a Lead Agency, which can be an agency, department, office, or division to oversee the implementation of Mitigation Trust on behalf of California. Within 120 days of the Mitigation Trust being established, the Governor can request that allocation of California’s $381 million be paid out to California for its use according to the terms set out in Appendix D. The consent decree only allows up to one-third to be paid out during the first year, or up to two-thirds during the first two years.

How will the Mitigation Fund projects be selected?

For the Mitigation Trust, California will undertake a public process to allow members of the Legislature and the public to provide input and comments on which projects identified in Appendix D should be funded by the settlement. How will the Investment Commitment projects be decided? For the ZEV Investment Commitment, approval of the Consent Decree triggers a 100-day window for CARB and VW to meet to discuss CARB’s ideas for the draft California Investment Plan. CARB will host a public process before it meets with VW. VW then has 120 days after the consent decree is approved to submit its draft proposed investment plan for the first 30-month investment cycle to CARB for CARB’s approval. This plan must contain projects totaling at least $200 million dollars, and is expected to invest in ZEV charging and other infrastructure, as well as public outreach. VW will submit an investment plan every 29 months after that, each one covering $200 million dollars in investments until the full $800 million is spent. CARB will take public input and provide ideas and comments to VW on each funding plan. Each plan will only be approved after CARB’s comments are addressed.

What kind of environmental projects will be paid for out of the Mitigation Trust?

To address all past and future excess emissions of NOx from the 2.0-liter cars sold in California under the terms of the Consent Decree, VW must pay about $381 million over a three-year period into a trust for projects to replace older and dirtier heavy duty diesel vehicles and equipment with cleaner vehicles and equipment, including advanced zero- or near-zero technologies. This provides an opportunity to focus reductions of emissions in disadvantaged communities and other communities that were impacted . Californians will have the opportunity for public input on potential projects to be funded with this money. California’s share of the $2.7 billion mitigation fund is proportional to its share of the total number of affected diesel cars.

What is included in the money in the ZEV Investment Commitment?

Under the consent decree, Volkswagen's investments could include zero-emission vehicle fueling and charging infrastructure, brand-neutral consumer awareness campaigns to increase awareness of the zero-emission vehicle market, and projects such as car-sharing programs that will increase access to zero emission vehicles for all consumers in California. These projects will support the next generation of zero emission vehicles that will be sold in California, helping to build the foundation for achieving the State's air quality and climate goals.

Where can I go to comment on the proposed project selection for the Mitigation Trust or ZEV Investment Commitment?

Selection of projects will be determined with input from a public process, including public workshops and comment periods. Information about upcoming workshops will be posted at https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/vw_info/vw-diesel-info/vw-diesel-info.htm .  If you have additional questions about either elements of the mitigation in the Consent Decree, please contact pio@arb.ca.gov.

If you want to learn more about Volkswagen?s ZEV Investment Commitment or submit a proposal, visit www.electrifyamerica.com

California will receive about $1.2 billion in total. VW must pay into two separate programs. The first provides about $381 million to California for NOx mitigation (the Mitigation Trust). The second will be a zero emission vehicle (ZEV) investment fund (the ZEV Investment Commitment). $800 million dollars from that fund will be invested in California. This money does not address penalties or any claims concerning 3.0-liter diesel vehicles, and does not address any potential criminal liability. Those will be addressed in a separate process.

Glossary

Have you ever wondered what a baghouse is or what NMOG stands for?